Lead by the Example (1 Peter 5:1-4)

1 Peter 5:1-4

Stephen Covey’s The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People remains one of the most influential leadership books in recent times. Though things have changed somewhat since he published it in 1989, his conclusions regarding leadership trends in America continue to carry weight. Covey concluded that the prior 50-years of American leadership literature was primarily concerned with superficial, quick fixes. However, the unanimous trend in American leadership literature during the first 150-years of our nation’s history was primarily on character ethics. 

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A shepherd leads eagerly not greedily (1 Peter 5:1-4)

1 Peter 5:1-4

Francis Collins, the Director of the National Institute of Health, gave the commencement address at Southern Methodist University a few years ago. In that address, he mentioned the difference between what political commentator David Brooks calls resume virtues and eulogy virtues. Resume virtues are the things you put on a job application, resume, or CV. Eulogy virtues are the things people will say about you when your work on earth ends. Resume virtues tell the things you did to advance yourself, your position, and your finances. Eulogy virtues tell not only how you handled your successes but also your failures, not only how you treated your peers and coworkers, but how you treated your spouse and children. Collins asked a question to those graduates that we ought to ask ourselves, “Are you spending your time on resume virtues or are you spending your time on eulogy virtues?”

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Shepherd Leaders are Willing to Lead (1 Peter 5:1-4)

1 Peter 5:1-4

In out last blog we compared the leadership style of a shepherd to that of a wolf. A shepherd puts the interest of the flock before his or her own. The wolf ravages the flock and leads for their own advantage rather than the care of the flock. If the leadership style of a wolf can be marked by vices such as sloth, greed, and power, the leadership style of a shepherd offers a cure for each of these maladies in the form of a virtue. Let us first look at sloth.

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